Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Quote of the Day: David Cameron



"As long as I am Prime Minister, I will not join the Euro."

David Cameron, Morley, 28 April

34 comments:

Sinbad the sailor said...

And we are supposed to be impressed by this? The general view away from the political bubble is that Cameron should be walking this election and be 10-12% ahead.

The "Cast iron" that turned to jelly when prodded was I suspect the deciding factor as put simply he is not trusted.

Roland Deschain said...

That's not likely to be very long though, is it?

Simon Gardner said...

Actually, though I have numerous reasons not to vote Tory - far too many to enumerate - this doctrinaire and ignorant b******s is probably my current number one reason.

(Leaving aside the fact that of course I had no Tory candidate and that I’ve already voted anyway.)

tapestry said...

Clegg - I'll tell you what I want. What I really really want.

davidc said...

is this a 'cast iron' promise ??

English First said...

Yes I`m sure. He also stated that we would have a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty! Remember? The man is, like the rest, a compulsive liar!

Libertarian said...

So that rename it EDollars after they kick out Greece and Portugal.

Sorry ALL the 3 main parties have reneged on "cast iron" manifesto, commitments and promises.

Don't believe a word he or they say

George said...

But will he keep it?

We all recall, with a frisson, his promise, cast iron, re referenda on Lisbon.

So what's different here?.

Tom said...

I rather approve of the Monster Raving Loony Party's policy of inviting Europe to join the pound.

Scan said...

Iain, Dave's on pretty safe ground to say that at the moment. With the monetary problems in Greece and Portugal and the subsequent falling out of other EU members, the Euro (and the EU itself) isn't a great direction to go right now; and secondly, if he doesn't have a big enough majority he might only be Prime Minister for five months.

so, it's not such a bold statement as it initially sounds.

neil craig said...

I suspect if Cameron had not broken, or even if he had never made, the "cast-iron" promise he would be walking it. He would certainly be in a position to reverse the disgraceful LudDim claims that they are the ones to go to if you don't want broken promises.

Strangely enough the electorate don't like being unashamedly lied to. Equally if Labour hadn't repeatedly lied about a PR referendum their latest promise would be winning them votes.

MikeyP said...

Why should believe this, any more than some of his other quotes. The only thing he has going for him is that he is not such a big liar as Gormless or van Clegganov!

waddell said...

Cameron's cast iron guarantee went rusty simply because there was no treaty to vote on. Remember the guarantee was made at a time when there was a reasonable chance DC could have kept the promise. Arguing for a treaty now on a treaty which has already been ratified across Europe seems a little farcical. It's really no longer in DC's gift to grant a referendum on Lisbon now and my only criticism is that he hasn't been firmer about defending his position on this.

Lady Finchley said...

What all you euro-bores don't seem to understand is that it was not in David Cameron's gift to have a referendum - he was not the Prime Minister.

And I will repeat this in words you can understand - you cannot have a referendum on a treaty that has already been ratified.

James said...

Not wishing to intrude on internal Tory Party grief, but the 1975 referendum was on a treaty that had already been ratified, Lady Finchley.

Just Wonderful said...

Quote of the day from Gordon Brown "it was a disaster, you should never have put me with that woman....some bigoted woman!"

Some bigoted woman?? The Prime Minister... doesn't he make you proud!

Future History of England said...

Impressive comment from a man who is doing so little to win an election, BUT, as we are in such a bad state, it might just work, along with the Olympics, for which the EU will push us to take the Euro at all locations, so people do not have to exchange currency (Because this means they need to know math and we know that is just too hard), and that will be the first step into the Euro. Well we all accept the euro, we might as well change, and Dave will not be able to do a thing about it.

Windsor Tripehound said...

English First said...
Yes I`m sure. He also stated that we would have a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty! Remember? The man is, like the rest, a compulsive liar!


Not this old rubbish again! Brown & Clegg promised a referendum, and were in a position to deliver it and reneged on the promise.

Cameron was not able to force a referendum at the time the treaty was ratified; he was out-voted by Labour and the LibDems, so let's put the blame were it belongs - with Brown and Clegg.

And assuming the Conservatives win the election, what would be the point of having a referendum on a done deal?

neil craig said...

Lady F says "And I will repeat this in words you can understand - you cannot have a referendum on a treaty that has already been ratified."

So equally simply the original referendum was carried out by Wilson after Heath had passed the treaty. Cameron could easily have done the same.

Saying something cannot be done when it already has been is clearly wrong.

Peter said...

2 words: "Cast Iron"

Simon Gardner said...

Actually, the “doctrine” about manifestos and pre-election promises would seem to be rather moot.

If nobody gets an overall majority, then they can’t and indeed won’t be under any moral or political obligation whatsoever to deliver anything that they had previously pledged in a manifesto that had just been rejected in an election.

After all, the voters had just thrown it out.

Lauchlan McLean said...

Clegg as Deputy Prime Minister will instruct him and the Chancellor Cable to open talks to adopt the Euro.If this happens then thousands will reconsider their position and switch to supporting UKIP.

Victor, NW Kent said...

"James said...

Not wishing to intrude on internal Tory Party grief, but the 1975 referendum was on a treaty that had already been ratified, Lady Finchley".

The question put in the 1975 referendum was simply whether you wished the UK to remain inside a European trade zone. Nothing to do with any treaty.

Lady Finchley said...

Learn your history, Euro-bores!

Robert said...

Did Cameron also say he would not increase VAT in his interview with Paxman?

His position on Europe is of course absurd. He wants to be in Europe but not run by Europe.As he needs all of the other 26 countries to supprt repatriating powers back to the UK he is on a hiding to nothing. Gordon Brown could not get the colleagues to reduce VAT on low energy light bulbs.

In the longer term if the Euro survives we will be forced into the Euro zone as a condition of continuing membership of the EU. If you want a precedent ask about Major's opt outs from Maastricht and how many are still operative.

Dave's promises are worthless like all politicians promises.

tapestry said...

There is a new brand of fruitcake on the street - an enhanced version called 'referendum nut'.

In 1997, every party had to have a promise of a euro referendum. But now you don't need such a thing. Merely by voting Conservative, you can sure of never having to lose the GBP.

If you want to get rid of the GBP, vote Lib Dem.

But those addicted to referendums feel cheated by having the policy so easily available, without any need for their input.

thespecialone said...

God there are some thickos posting on here and elsewhere about the 'cast-iron' quote. If you would read the caveat as well 'if it isnt ratified', then you will know why he had to do a U-turn. It was Labour (supported by the LDs) who reneged on their 2005 manifestoes. Or is that yet again selective hearing/reading from Labour and LD supporters?

Roger Thornhill said...

Maybe he won't, but he might force us all to!

Paddy Briggs said...

Fully agree with Simon Gardner - this is nonsense from Cameron (although he joins our distinguisehd Blog host in making such an inane "promise"). Why inane? Because times change - pretty rapidly these days. At some point in the future it is almost certain that it will be in Britain's interests to join the Euro. When - who knows? But any responsible poltician seeking the highest office should not rule it out so simplistically.

Libertarian said...

@LadyFinchley

Thanks for the patronizing post. To return the compliment here's an easy to understand piece of British electoral history.

The United Kingdom referendum of 1975 was a post-legislative referendum held on 5 June 1975 in the United Kingdom to gauge support for the country's continued membership of the European Economic Community (EEC), often known as the Common Market at the time, which it had entered in 1973 under the Conservative government of Edward Heath.



I will write the relevent bit in big letters now just so that you do understand


"POST-LEGISLATIVE REFERENDUM "

neil craig said...

Paddy joining the Euro would not be a "good for us this week" decision but a permanent one. So the idea that we should join impulsively because of some very short term effect is risible.

Lady Finchley said...

Dear Libertarian

Reading Wikipedia again?

jailhouselawyer said...

"As long as I am Prime Minister...".

Wishful thinking.

There's just the small matter of the election first.

If he loses, will the Tories keep him as leader?

James said...

Victor/Lady Finchley - I tend to agree with you that there is little to be gained in reopening Lisbon now it's been ratified.

But you're both dissembling by saying it couldn't possibly be reopened, as was Cameron. As I and others have said, the 1975 referendum was to all intents and purposes whether we wanted to withdraw from an existing Treaty (because that's what a "no" vote would necessarily have entailed). And it's entirely possible to have post-legislative referendums.